The beach boys - 1966 - 1969


The Beach Boys were one of America's finest goodtime harmony pop-surf-rock bands, climbing to the top of the early `60s charts on the strength of such hits as "Surfin ...

In the first half of February 1962, Jardine left the band and was replaced by Marks. The band recorded two more originals on April 19 at Western Studios, Los Angeles: "Lonely Sea" and " 409 ". They also re-recorded " Surfin' Safari ". [ citation needed ] During early 1962, Morgan requested that some of the members add vocals to a couple of instrumental tracks that he had recorded with other musicians. This led to the creation of the short-lived group Kenny & the Cadets, which Brian led under the pseudonym "Kenny". The other members were Carl, Jardine, and the Wilsons' mother Audree. [nb 3]

Wilson essentially made Pet Sounds without the rest of the band, using them only to flesh out the vocal arrangements. (He even considered putting the album out as a solo project, and the first single, "Caroline, No," was released under his own name.) Its luxurious sound conveys a heartbreaking wistfulness, and the deeply personal songs, which Wilson co-wrote primarily with lyricist Tony Asher, bid farewell to the innocent world of the Beach Boys' fun-in-the-sun hits. Unfortunately, Capitol Records proved no more enamored of Pet Sounds than had Love; the label considered not releasing it at all. Not yet vindicated by history, Wilson withdrew further into his inner world. "At the last meeting I attended concerning Pet Sounds ," Wilson wrote about his dealings with the label, "I showed up holding a tape player and eight prerecorded, looped responses, including 'No comment,' 'Can you repeat that?' 'No' and 'Yes.' Refusing to utter a word, I played the various tapes when appropriate."

The Smile sessions were intentionally limited to recording short interchangeable fragments also referred to as "modules". [54] With "Good Vibrations", Wilson further expanded his modular approach to recording, experimenting with compiling the finished track by editing together the numerous sections from multiple versions recorded at the lengthy tracking sessions. [nb 4] Instead of taping each backing track as a more-or-less complete performance—as had been the model for previous Beach Boys recordings—he split the arrangement into sections, recording multiple takes of each section and developing and changing the arrangements and the production as the sessions proceeded. He sometimes recorded the same section at several different studios, to exploit the unique sonic characteristics or special effects available in each. Then, he selected the best performances of each section and edited these together to create a composite which combined the best features of production and performance. This meant that each section of the song was presented in its own distinct sonic envelope, rather than the homogeneous production sound of a conventional "one take" studio recording. The cut-up structure and heavily edited production style of Smile was unique for its time in mainstream popular music, [40] [57] [58] and to assemble an entire album from short musical fragments was a relatively bold undertaking. [55]

The act first gained popularity as the musical spokesmen for surfing, girls, and cars, but their chief composer Brian Wilson's growing creative ambitions transformed them into a more artistically innovative combo. This innovation led to Beach Boys Concert Tickets being the dream of any true pop music fan.

The long awaited release of the Brian Wilson and Beach Boys masterpiece, Smile Sessions. With the full participation of original Beach Boys Al Jardine, Mike Love, and Brian Wilson, Capitol/EMI has, for the first time, collected and compiled the band's legendary 1966-'67 sessions for the never-completed SMiLE album. Rolling Stone magazine recently called SMiLE the most famous unfinished album in rock & roll history." 

NEW ARCHIVAL BEACH BOYS RELEASE: 1967 – SUNSHINE TOMORROW
1967 - Sunshine Tomorrow is a new archival 2CD and digital collection from The Beach Boys , released worldwide on June 30 by Capitol/UMe. 1967-ST features producers Mark Linett and Alan Boyd 's new, first-ever stereo mix of The Beach Boys' 1967 Wild Honey album and throws open the legendary band's vault to debut 54 sought-after 1967 rarities, 50 years after they were put to tape. Previously unreleased highlights on the new collection include The Beach Boys' shelved "live" album, Lei'd in Hawaii , studio recordings from the Wild Honey and Smiley Smile album sessions, and several standout concert recordings spanning 1967 to 1970. Wild Honey 's new stereo mix will also debut in a 180-gram vinyl 50th anniversary edition on July 21. More information . (updated 6-30-17)


The Beach Boys - 1966 - 1969The Beach Boys - 1966 - 1969The Beach Boys - 1966 - 1969The Beach Boys - 1966 - 1969

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